What is the Difference Between Being Content and Settling?

What’s the difference between being content and settling?

Arnold Palmer is one my favorite drinks, only to find later that he is a famous golfer. I heard that once he did a tour assisting a Saudi Arabian king in helping with some golfing. The king offered to send him a gift, but Arnold refused. The king insisted, and Arnold settles for a simple golf club. When he returned to the states, to his surprise, Mr. Palmer received a deed and title to one of the most beautiful Golf Clubs in Pennsylvania.

Content vs. Settling

Adam and Eve settled, over God, for knowledge in the garden. The Israelites settled for less and other idols that hindered them from an intimate relationship with the great Creator of all.

On the other hand, Paul consistently encouraged the early church to continue in the work of the Lord. He himself had learned the art of being content or in a state of peaceful happiness, in the midst of the busyness of the ministry. Nevertheless, he never settled for being a mediocre Christian.

“Disturb us, Lord, when we are too well pleased with ourselves, when our dreams have come true because we have dreamed too little, when we arrive safely because we sailed too close to the shore.” Sir Francis Drake. Sir Frances Drake never settled for being an ordinary shipmate, actually, Sir Frances Drake is known for how he lived, died, and was buried at sea.

Settling, though is not always evil, is having resolve or unwillingness to be challenged to do more, to be more, to serve more, to be a part something greater than ourselves. God is the goal, and like Arnold Palmer, many times in my life, I settled for less than what my King is offering.

“Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize.” (1 Corinthians 9:24)

Are you settling or being content? Chaplain Juan Mendez is a graduate of the Colony of Mercy and serves full-time as at the Colony. You can write to Juan at jmendez@americaskeswick.org

Daily Bible Reading: Isaiah 17-19; Mark 5:1-20 

Think About This: “Worry does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow; it empties today of its strength.” ~Corrie Ten Boom

This Week’s Verse to Memorize:  Be of good courage, and let us be strong for our people and for the cities of our God. And may the Lord do what is good in His sight. 2 Samuel 10:12

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